Missing

 

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Katie, at cakes, tea, and dreams, posted a list of all the things she misses right now, and asked her readers what they are missing. Here’s my top five, in no particular order:

the library. A few online purchases and re-reads of home library tomes does not compare to the endless and varied supply of books-on-loan. I love the thematic displays  librarians creatively provide, and long to browse the shelves.

happy hours. Zoom has sufficed, but prefer my people to be in-person. Plans are afoot to meet in P.J.’s lovely garden, sipping beverages in the open air. Can’t wait.

proximity. It’s the ability to catch another’s scent, to occupy the same multi-dimensional space, to avail myself of non-verbal cues and gestures, that I miss.

thrifting. It’s been too long since last strolling the aisles, treasure hunting, and the thrill of a ‘find’— the batik summer skirt, an exquisite cream and sugar set.

Leo. Ruffling his hair. Snuggling on the couch for a book read. Working side-by-side to give his dinosaurs their bath. (So messy, and so delightful.)

I  miss being with others.  I miss the America I thought I lived in, but probably never did. Perhaps racism and lack of civility are just more evident now, certainly more obvious to me. For all gathering to protest peaceably, thank you. Wear a mask.*

*And Thanks to Alicia’s friend and to Susan, for The McCullough Mask Collection.

 

 

 

More With Less

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Where do we find it? Support, that is. Singers conjure up complicated explanations and practices in the quest to support their sound, and much of my work as an Alexander Technique teacher is assisting them in re-thinking their understanding of support.

Could support for singing, for standing, for sitting in this chair, for mixing up the evening meal’s cornbread batter, could all of these activities of daily life require less of me, rather than more? Less effort, less striving, less trying.

As you might have guessed, my unequivocal answer is ‘YES.’ Less is more. Doris Janzen Longacre’s cookbook title comes to mind; More-with-Less. Let’s apply this revolutionary thought to where you find yourself right now, reading this post.

What could you do less of, and still be engaged in reading? What could I do less of as I write this post? Less thigh grip. Less toe gripping in my boots. Less pulling in of my arms as I speed-type on the keyboard. There. An unsolicited, but most welcome, full breath. More with less.

(About the cookbook: As newlyweds making home, Longacre’s cookbook was our go-to source for meal planning. I used it so much it fell apart, and after decades, it finally went the way of the recycling bin, with a few pages saved for the kitchen’s 3-ring binder. Enter a January thrift store expedition, where I found, unsought, this copy in excellent condition. May you too know the delight of an unexpected boon this very day.)

 

 

Dressing for Ease

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“What should I wear to my Alexander Technique lesson?”  My answer:  ‘Wear what’s comfortable. Nothing special or particular is required.’  However, I do have a few directives for my own daily dressing:

No more heels. Hallelujah!

Denim on occasion, not everyday.

Natural fibers only. Cotton and linen are go-to’s, with some wool, if it is soft and light.

Camisoles exclusively.  Read:  NO bras.

 

Comfy Shoes: Easton Shoes  on Kenny Road. Owners Lenny and Marcia Comeras travel the world to bring Columbus the finest in footwear.  Finn Comfort, Hartjes, Thierry Rabotin, Mephisto, are a few of the brands carried.   Bi-annual sales make these shoes affordable.

Denim:  Just wear Second Yoga jeans, and forget about it.  You can get a committee-selected* pair at Cheesecake Boutique in Upper Arlington.  Pay the money and don’t blink.  * (Staff weighs in on the best look and fit. No baggy butts allowed!  Very fun retail experience, which says a lot, coming from shopping-averse me.)

Natural Fibers:  Still working on this one, and relying on friends for assistance.  Current-Paris-resident, Julie Donnell, swears by anything Eileen Fisher.  This line is way out of my price range, and I have yet to purchase any of their pieces.  Sales do exist. Susan Petry is gifted at finding fine fabric pieces in thrift stores and second-hand shops, so that’s always an option. (see photo’s aqua scarf for an example of the treasures that await your next thrifting expedition)

Camisoles:   A clearance rack at Anthropologie in the Short North District provided me with the best-ever-camis.  They don’t roll up my torso, and have one side v-neck, the other scooped.  Shelf-bra tops are an excellent alternative to camis and can be found at my favorite location for a mammogram, The Stephanie Spielman Breast Center.  The lobby houses a gift shop! amoena is the brand name.

Have a rollicking good time shopping your way to comfort——-